Isolation of phosphate solubilizing bacteria from acacia tree rhizophere soil

  • Musin Kelel Department of Biotechnology School of Biological and Chemical Sciences & Technology, Addis Ababa Science and Technology University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
  • Getaw Abera Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Natural and Computational Sciences University of Gondar
  • Agerie Yisma Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Natural and Computational Sciences University of Gondar
  • Bitweded Molla Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Natural and Computational Sciences University of Gondar
  • Niku Gebre Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Natural and Computational Sciences University of Gondar
  • Tigist Adugna Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Natural and Computational Sciences University of Gondar
  • Gary Wessel Division of Biology and Medicine, Brown University, G-L168 185 Meeting Street Providence, Rhode Island, USA

Abstract

Phosphorous is an essential plant nutrient whose deficiency severely restricts crop yield and it is the least available nutrient to plants. Phosphate solubilizing bacteria play an essential role in the phosphorus nutrition cycle by enhancing its availability to plants through release from inorganic and organic soil phosphate pools. In this study, we sought to isolate phosphate solublizing bacteria (PSB) from soil of the Acacia plant rhizophere. Candidate colonies were grown on National Botanical Research Institute’s phosphate (NBRIP) screening medium with 0.5% tricalcium phosphate (TCA) to determine phosphate liberation capabilities. The colonies were tested to temperatures (270 C, 370 C, 470 C and 570 C) and pH (from 4 to 9) compatibility, as well as heavy metal exposure (0- 0.12 μg/ml HgCl(II)). We learned that PSB colonies isolated from the Acacia plant rhizophere soil demonstrated high phosphate liberating activity (on NBRIP medium containing TCA) and survived temperatures to 470C over a pH range of 4.5 to 8.5, and up to .02 μg/ml HgCl(II). These results provide a strong baseline source for application in agriculture when a bio-fertilizeris required. Key words: Phosphate solubizing, Bacteria, Acacia, Tri-calcium-phosphate.

Author Biographies

Musin Kelel, Department of Biotechnology School of Biological and Chemical Sciences & Technology, Addis Ababa Science and Technology University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Department of Biotechnology School of Biological and Chemical Sciences & Technology, Addis Ababa Science and Technology University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Getaw Abera, Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Natural and Computational Sciences University of Gondar
Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Natural and Computational Sciences University of Gondar
Agerie Yisma, Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Natural and Computational Sciences University of Gondar
Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Natural and Computational Sciences University of Gondar
Bitweded Molla, Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Natural and Computational Sciences University of Gondar
Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Natural and Computational Sciences University of Gondar
Niku Gebre, Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Natural and Computational Sciences University of Gondar
Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Natural and Computational Sciences University of Gondar
Tigist Adugna, Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Natural and Computational Sciences University of Gondar
Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Natural and Computational Sciences University of Gondar
Gary Wessel, Division of Biology and Medicine, Brown University, G-L168 185 Meeting Street Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Division of Biology and Medicine, Brown University, G-L168 185 Meeting Street Providence, Rhode Island, USA

References

Agrawal S.K.M. and R. K. Pathak. Agricultural Science Research Journals 2012:92-94.

Kannaiyan, S., Kumar, K. and Govindarajan, K. Scientific pub. ( India), Jodhpur 2004 .

Rodriguez, H., Fraga, R .Biotechnol. Adv. 1999: 319-339.

Bar–Yosef, B, Rogers, R.D., Wolform, J.H. and Richman, E. Soils Sci. Society Amer. J. 1999: 1703–8.

Bisen, P.S. and Verma, K. In: “Handbook of Microbiology.” CBS publishers and distributors, New Delhi (1996).

Hopkins B, Ellsworth, J. Phosphorus Availability with Alkaline/calcareous Soil. Western Nutrient Management

Conference. Salt Lake City (2005).

Sharma, S., Kumar, V., Tripathi, R.B. J. Microbiol. Biotech. Res. 2011: 90-95.

Mahdi, S.S., Hassan, G.I., Hussain, A., Faisul-ur-Rasool. Research Journal of Agricultural Scie. 2011: 174-179.

Prasad, R. J. Trop. Agr. 2009: 1-17.

Gyaneshwar, P., Naresh, K.G., Parekh, L. J. Plant Soil 2002: 83-93.

Ryu, J.H.,Madhaiyan, M., Poonguzhali, S., Yim,W.J., Indiragandhi, P., Kim, K.A., Anandham R., Yun, J.C., Sa, T.M. J. Microbiol. Biotechnol.2006: 1622-1628.

Poonguzhali, S., Madhaiyan, M., Thangaraju, M., Ryu, J.H., Chung, K.Y., Sa, T.M. J. Microbiol. Biotechnol.2005: 903-908.

Sharma, K.N. and Namdeo, K.N. Crop Research. (Hisar) 1999: 164-169.

Datta, M., Banik, S., Gupta, R.K..Plant soil 1982: 365-383.

Nautiya, S . FEMS Microbiol. letters 1999: 265-270.

Keneni, A., Assefa, F., Prabu, P.C. J. Agr. Sci. Tech. 2010:79-89.

Kannapiran, E., Ramkumar, S.V..Annals of Biological Res.2011: 157-163.

Park, J., Bolan, N., Meghara, M., Naidu, R. Pedologist 2010: 67-75.

Published
2017-03-26
Section
Article