Characterization and applications of Pullulan and chitosan produced by fermentation

  • Periyasamy Bharathi College of Pharmacy, Sri Ramakrishna Institute of Paramedical Sciences, Coimbatore - 44, Tamil Nadu, India
  • Manchinella Gopalrao College of Pharmacy, Sri Ramakrishna Institute of Paramedical Sciences, Coimbatore - 44, Tamil Nadu, India
  • Ramanathan Akila College of Pharmacy, Sri Ramakrishna Institute of Paramedical Sciences, Coimbatore - 44, Tamil Nadu, India

Abstract

Chitin is highly insoluble N - acetylated polymer yet to find large scale industrial applications. Chitosan is an acid soluble deacetylated form of chitin. The physicochemical characteristics of chitosan depend on the degree of deacetylation. In this research work cell wall pullulan, an alpha glucan was isolated from the strain Aureobasidium mausonii NCIM 1226 the biomass obtained was further transformed in to another useful polymer chitosan using the strain Alcaligenes faecalis NCIM 2444. Produced polymers were characterized by using FT-IR, and 1HNMR spectroscopic methods. The polymers were also evaluated for its antimicrobial activity. Chitosan possessed degree of deacetylation (DDA) in the range of 86-91%, and both standard and isolated polymers having identical FT-IR, 1HNMR spectrum. Chitosan possesses good antibacterial activity and pullulan showed negative antimicrobial activity. Keywords: Chitin, chitosan, pullulan, degree of deacetylation, microspheres

Author Biographies

Periyasamy Bharathi, College of Pharmacy, Sri Ramakrishna Institute of Paramedical Sciences, Coimbatore - 44, Tamil Nadu, India
College of Pharmacy, Sri Ramakrishna Institute of Paramedical Sciences, Coimbatore - 44, Tamil Nadu, India
Manchinella Gopalrao, College of Pharmacy, Sri Ramakrishna Institute of Paramedical Sciences, Coimbatore - 44, Tamil Nadu, India
College of Pharmacy, Sri Ramakrishna Institute of Paramedical Sciences, Coimbatore - 44, Tamil Nadu, India
Ramanathan Akila, College of Pharmacy, Sri Ramakrishna Institute of Paramedical Sciences, Coimbatore - 44, Tamil Nadu, India
College of Pharmacy, Sri Ramakrishna Institute of Paramedical Sciences, Coimbatore - 44, Tamil Nadu, India

References

R Chandra, R Rustgi, Prog Polym Sci, 1998, 23, 1273-1335.

A Bakar, U Nautiyal, M S Kumar, Bharat Bhusan, Int J Med Pharm Res, 2014, 2(2), 72-77.

MA Meyers, PY Chen, AYM Lin, Y Seki, Prog Mater Sci, 2008, 53, 1-206.

VS Akhilesh, Pharmacologyonline, 2011, 1, 666-674.

V Suneetha, KV Sindhuja, K Sanjeev, Asian J Microbiol Biotechnol Environ Sci, 2010, 12(2), 149-155.

KC Cheng, A Demirci, JM Catchmark, Food Sci Technol Int, 2011, 17(3), 99-109.

ZM Chi, SZ Zhao, Enzyme Microb Technol, 2003, 33(1), 206-211.

BX Li, N Zhang, Q Peng, T Yin, FF Guan, GL Wang, Y Li, Appl Microbiol Biotechnol, 2009, 84(2), 293-300.

M Bishwambhar, V Suneetha, R Kalyani, J Appl Pharm Sci, 2011, 01(06), 45-50.

E Khor, Elsevier Science Ltd, 1st edition, Oxford, UK, 2001.

PK Datta, J Datta, VS Tripathi, J Sci Ind Res, 2004, 63, 20-31.

H Terayama, J Polym Sci, 1952, 8 243-253.

P Broussignac, AIHAJ, 1968, 99, 1241-1247.

RM Akila, S Krishnan, P Bharathi, Pharm Biotech Microbio, 2013, 2, 1-3.

VR, Srinivasan, US 5739015 A.

D Rho, A Mulchandani, JHT Luong, Appl Microb Biotechnol, 1988, 28, 361-366.

T Roukas, Process Biochem, 1998, 33, 805-810.

JG Domszy, GAF Roberts, Macromol Chem, 1985, 186, 1671-1677.

M Miya, R Iwamoto, S Yoshikawa, S Mima, Int J Biol Macromol, 1980, 2, 323-325.

GK Moore, GAF Roberts, Int J Biol Macromol, 1980, 2, 115-116.

RM Akila, Adv Appl Sci Res, 2014, 5(4), 157-170.

SS Ram, KS Gaganpreet, JF Kennedy, Carbohydr Polym, 2009, 78(1), 89-94.

M Tako, Y Dobashi, J Shimabukuro, Carbohydr Polym, 2013, 92(2), 2135-2140.

A Hirai, H Odani, A Nakajima, Polym Bull, 1991, 26, 87-94.

ML Duarte, MC Ferreira, MR Marvao, J Rocha, Int J Biol Macromol, 2001, 28, 359-363.

LH Gibson, Coughlin RW, Biotechnol Prog, 2002, 18, 675-678.

Published
2017-03-27
Section
Article