Studies on antibacterial activities of Senna alata,(L.)against clinical pathogens

  • D. Sarathadevi Post-Graduate & Research Department of Zoology, Alagappa Government Arts College, Karaikudi, India
  • S. S. N. Somasundaram Post-Graduate & Research Department of Zoology, Alagappa Government Arts College, Karaikudi, India

Abstract

Medicinal plants represent a rich source of antimicrobial agents, being used in different countries as a source of many potent and powerful drugs. Hence, the present investigation was carried out the antimicrobial activity of various parts of plant of S.alataagainst four pathogenic bacteria such as Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, using agar well diffusion assay.The results revealed that the extracts are potent antimicrobials against for all the microorganisms studied and the zone of inhibition diameter ranged from 0 to 18 mm. For all the tested microorganisms, leaves extract showed maximum (18 mm) antibacterial activity. Hence, among the various parts, the leaves part can be best for treat bacterial diseases. The antibacterial activity of the herbal extracts was more pronounced on the gram-positive bacteria S. aureus than the gram-negative bacteria E. coli. The results of this work suggest that the extract ofS.alata have a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity, which can be used as an alternative for antibiotics. Key words: Antimicrobial Activity, Senna alata, Pathogenic Bacteria and Medicinal plants.

Author Biographies

D. Sarathadevi, Post-Graduate & Research Department of Zoology, Alagappa Government Arts College, Karaikudi, India
Post-Graduate & Research Department of Zoology, Alagappa Government Arts College, Karaikudi, India
S. S. N. Somasundaram, Post-Graduate & Research Department of Zoology, Alagappa Government Arts College, Karaikudi, India
Post-Graduate & Research Department of Zoology, Alagappa Government Arts College, Karaikudi, India

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Published
2017-03-31
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Article