Cultural conditions for optimum production of antimicrobial compound from endophytic bacterial strain isolated from Flacourtia jangomas (Lour.) Raeusch

  • Swati Shukla Department of Biotechnology, D.D.U. Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur, India
  • Gaurav Naik Department of Biotechnology, D.D.U. Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur, India
  • Sarad Kumar Mishra Department of Biotechnology, D.D.U. Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur, India

Abstract

A total of 13 bacterial endophytes were isolated from different parts of Flacourtia jangomas (Lour.) Raeusch, a medicinal plant. Out of 13 strains, FjR1 (isolated from root of F. jangomas) and FjF2 (from fruit of F. jangomas) showed potential antimicrobial activity against all pathogenic bacteria tested. In this study, various parameters were optimized for maximum production of antimicrobial compound from strain FjR1. The evaluation of antimicrobial activity of strain FjR1 was checked against pathogenic bacteria Pseudomonas sp. Zone of inhibition was used to determine the effect of different parameters on production of antimicrobial compound by agar well diffusion method. Maximum production was obtained in YPD media at pH 7 with 8% inoculum size. The endophytic bacterium started producing antimicrobial compound from 2nd day which reached maximum at 3rd day and thereafter it started decreasing. Optimum production was found when fructose as a carbon source, ammonium nitrate as an inorganic nitrogen source and yeast extract as an organic nitrogen source were used. Keywords: Pseudomonas sp., Flacourtia jangomas, Antimicrobial activity, Endophytes

Author Biographies

Swati Shukla, Department of Biotechnology, D.D.U. Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur, India
Department of Biotechnology, D.D.U. Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur, India
Gaurav Naik, Department of Biotechnology, D.D.U. Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur, India
Department of Biotechnology, D.D.U. Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur, India
Sarad Kumar Mishra, Department of Biotechnology, D.D.U. Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur, India
Department of Biotechnology, D.D.U. Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur, India

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Published
2017-03-31
Section
Article