Prevalence of multiple antibiotic resistant (MAR) Salmonella sp. isolated from environmental samples in Ado Ekiti metropolis in Ekiti State

  • Osibote Iyadunni Adesola Department of Microbiology, College of Science, Afe Babalola University, Ado-Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria
  • Osibote Boluwatife Aina Department of Environmental Health Science, Faculty of Public Health, University of Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria
  • Oluyege Jacob Olaoluwa Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Ekiti State University, Ado Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria

Abstract

This study investigated the prevalence of multiple antibiotics resistance (MAR) in Salmonella sp isolated from environmental samples in Ado Ekiti metropolis. Isolation was done using Salmonella-Shigella agar, after which the isolates were subjected to various biochemical tests. This was followed by a confirmatory test using Salmonella test kit. The confirmed Salmonella isolates were subjected to antibiotic susceptibility tests using different antibiotic discs and their MAR patterns were observed. Statistical analysis was done to determine if the source of isolation is responsible for MAR observed among the isolates. Thirty eight Salmonella isolates were obtained from the samples collected. The confirmatory test revealed that all the isolates were Salmonella sp by showing agglutination within two minutes. The percentage resistance observed among Salmonella species to the various antibiotic discs used are: amoxicillin (73.68%), nitrofurantoin (52.63%), nalidixic acid (57.89%), pefloxacin (39.47%), norfloxacin (26.31%), ciprofloxacin (34.21%) and ofloxacin (26.31%) with amoxicillin being resisted the most while the isolates were more susceptible to ofloxacin. Some MAR patterns observed among the isolates include PEF/OFX/CIP/NOR/NAL/NIT/AMX, CIP/NOR/AMX/NAL/NIT and NOR/NAL/AMX among others. Statistical analysis revealed that there was no significant difference in the resistance of Salmonella sp. from different sources to the different antibiotics used. It can be deduced from this study that improper disposal of wastes in dunghills and disposal of untreated waste water into the environment favours the occurrence of MAR bacteria in the environment; hence maintenance of hygienic practices and treatment of waste water can help in curbing or reducing it. Keywords: dunghills, waste water, resistance, antibiotics susceptibility

Author Biographies

Osibote Iyadunni Adesola, Department of Microbiology, College of Science, Afe Babalola University, Ado-Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria
Department of Microbiology, College of Science, Afe Babalola University, Ado-Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria
Osibote Boluwatife Aina, Department of Environmental Health Science, Faculty of Public Health, University of Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria
Department of Environmental Health Science, Faculty of Public Health, University of Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria
Oluyege Jacob Olaoluwa, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Ekiti State University, Ado Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria
Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Ekiti State University, Ado Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria

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Published
2017-03-28
Section
Article